Meet The Pollinators2022-02-21T15:11:39+00:00

MEET THE

POLLINATORS

MEET THE POLLINATORS.

Our British insects are heroes! They pollinate our fruit, they control pests and they improve our soil. Without all of our wonderful insects we at Jam Packed HQ would have no ingredients to be able to do what we do. This is why we are putting them front and centre of our products and encourage everyone to do what they can to support these beautiful creatures we all depend on.

Most people think of honey bees if they think of pollinators, but there are many other insects that get in on the act too! This includes hoverflies, moths, beetles, wasps and others and you will see several different types showcased across our products to raise awareness of the role that they play in food production.

Our seasonal butterflies are declining at a faster rate in towns and cities than in the countryside. They may not always pollinate our fruit directly, but they have an important part to play in pollinating wild flowers that are important sources of food for bees and other insects that do pollinate our fruit. This makes them perfect for putting on the labels of our seasonal and rare fruit jams.

Adonis Blue Butterfly – on Loganberry Jam2022-02-21T16:08:42+00:00

The Adonis Blue butterfly is found on chalk downland in the south of England around Jam Packed HQ. This species has been in decline and is a rare find, just like the loganberry! Further information can be found on the Butterfly Conservation website.

Ashy Mining Bee – on Apricot Jam2022-02-21T14:46:28+00:00

The Ashy Mining bee is a solitary bee that nests in the ground in patches of bare sandy soil. They are commonly found throughout England and Wales and are often seen in spring pollinating fruit trees. They also feed on gorse, hawthorn, blackthorn and a wide variety of spring flowers and shrubs. If you see a small “volcano” of earth with a central burrow, you may be giving a home to an Ashy Mining Bee. Further information can be found at the Bumblebee Conservation Trust website.

Baccha Hoverfly – on Tipsy Seville Marmalade (fine cut)2022-02-23T16:34:21+00:00

This beautiful elongated hoverfly is found in a variety of habitats including woodland, scrubland and gardens. They prefer shady areas closer to the ground and their larvae feed on aphids. Further information can be found on the Global Biodiversity Information Facility Website.

Common Carder Bee – on Raspberry and Redcurrant Jam2022-02-21T15:00:03+00:00

The common carder bee is widespread throughout the UK and is the latest of the bumblebees to be found flying from nests in late summer. This means it is especially helpful for pollinating later flowering raspberries and blackberries among other fruits. Further information can be found on the Bumblebee Conservation Trust website.

Devil’s Coach Horse – on Naga Chilli Jam2022-02-23T15:45:40+00:00

This fierce little beetle is commonly found in gardens and hedgerows. When threatened it will curl up its tail like a scorpion. It has a powerful (and painful!) bite and loves to prey on invertebrates at night and is the gardener’s friend – it loves to eat slugs. Further information can be found on the Wildlife Trusts website.

Elephant Hawk Moth – on Bramble Jelly2022-02-21T16:15:08+00:00

This beautiful nocturnal moth feeds on nectars from tubular flowers, such as honeysuckle and petunias. It is an important pollinator, but the caterpillars also feed on the invasive non-native Himalayan Balsam. Further information can be found on the Butterfly Conservation website.

Emperor Dragonfly – on apple sauce2022-02-23T18:10:52+00:00

The Emperor Dragonfly is  a stunning blue and apple green coloured insect that is a friend to any gardener. They feed on flies, gnats, mosquitos, flying ants and other flying pests, although they will also catch the occasional bee or moth as well. Further information can be found on the British Dragonfly Society website.

False Oil Beetle – on courgette chutney2022-02-23T17:39:05+00:00

The False Oil Beetle, also known as the thick-legged beetle, is a beautiful iridescent green colour. It is only the males that have thickened thighs. It feeds on pollen, so is an excellent general pollinator as it moves from one flower to another. Further information can be found on the Sussex Wildlife Trust website.

Golden Hoverfly – on Lemon Marmalade2022-02-23T16:27:12+00:00

The golden hoverfly is rare in the UK now. It is most likely to be found in ancient woodland in southern parts of England. It is a beautiful metallic gold colour and covered in hair. Its larvae live in rot holes in trees. Further information can be found on the Buglife website.

Green Tiger Beetle – on Scotch Bonnet Chilli Jam2022-02-23T15:36:25+00:00

The green tiger beetle is a ferocious predator. This beautiful and speedy little beetle is a bright vibrant metallic-green colour with purple and bronze on its legs. Its preferred habitat is across moorland, heathland and sandy soiled grasslands. It loves nothing more than munching on a few caterpillars! Further information can be found on the Wildlife Trusts website.

Hairy-Footed Flower Bee – on Strawberry and Rhubarb Jam2022-02-21T14:48:10+00:00

This is one of the earliest solitary bees to emerge in spring, just as rhubarb is one of the earliest ingredients available in the seasonal fruit calendar. They are commonly found across England and Wales and are more concentrated in the southern counties of the country. They forage on a variety of early spring flowers and pollinate as they go! Further information can be found on the Bumblebee Conservation Trust website.

Honey Bee – on Raspberry Jam2022-02-21T15:01:01+00:00

Honey bees are one of the UK’s most prolific pollinators. The bees we keep in our back garden have been pollinating our loganberry and raspberry canes for years, but will also take advantage of spring flowering apple and cherry blossom as well as brambles later in the season. Honey bees will fly up to three miles from their colony to forage from a good source of nectar and this is the only bee to store excess nectar as honey. It is the surplus honey that the bees make each year that beekeepers will harvest, leaving enough for the bees to feed on throughout the winter. Further information can be found on the British Beekeepers Association website.

Hornet Mimic Hoverfly – on Ginger and Seville Marmalade2022-02-23T18:28:49+00:00

The hornet mimic hoverfly, also known as the belted hoverfly, is the largest hoverfly in the UK. It is more common in the South, but its range is gradually increasing northwards. The markings may mimic a hornet, but this hoverfly is harmless and has no sting. Further information can be found on the Wildlife Trusts website.

Ladybird – on pumpkin chutney2022-02-23T17:41:46+00:00

Probably the UK’s most loved and easily recognised beetles, the ladybird is a gardener’s friend. Its larvae feed on aphids. The adults hibernate in hollow plant stems so putting up a bug hotel is likely to encourage them into your garden. There are a number of sub-species, each with a different number of black spots on their red wing cases or in different colour combinations. We have featured the most common seven-spot ladybird on our chutney. Further information can be found on the Wildlife Trusts website.

Logjammer hoverfly – on Three Fruit Marmalade2022-02-23T17:32:06+00:00

The logjammer hoverfly is so-called because it is most commonly seen resting on piles of logs or woody debris that collect in streams. The larvae live and feed inside partially submerged wet wood. This hoverfly mimics the honeybee. Further information can be found on the Staffordshire Wildlife Trust website.

Long Horned Bee – on Gooseberry and Elderflower Jam2022-02-21T15:03:23+00:00

Long-horned bees have been declining in the UK and are now a UK priority species to protect. They will forage in a variety of habitats and are particularly fond of brambles and pea species of plants. Further information can be found on the Bumblebee Conservation Trust website.

Longhorn Beetle – on Spicy mango chutney2022-02-23T17:49:35+00:00

The longhorn beetle on our spicy mango chutney is one of a family of 42 longhorn beetles that live in the UK, each has a different pattern of markings and colour. They are particularly fond of woodland and hedgerows and can be seen from May to August. They are efficient pollinators, but as their larvae develop in decaying wood they also help to return nutrients to the soil. Further information can be found on the UK Beetle Recording website, where there is even information about how to get involved in recording sightings of these beautiful creatures.

Magpie Moth – on Quince Jelly2022-02-21T16:17:23+00:00

The Magpie Moth was one of the species studied in a research project to find out more about the impact of pollinating moths. They travel further than bees and pollinate at night. They like open flowers like bramble (blackberries) and will pollinate other similar species of berries. Further information can be found on the Butterfly Conservation website.

Marmalade Hoverfly – on Seville Marmalade (fine cut)2022-02-23T16:29:20+00:00

Well it just had to be done! We had to hero the marmalade hoverfly on our best-selling Seville marmalade. This beautiful orange and black striped hoverfly is often found in gardens feeding on open flat flowers or resting on vegetation. The adults are pollinators, while the larvae feed on aphids so are the gardener’s friend for their role in pest control. Further information can be found on the RSPB website.

Minotaur Beetle – on Trinidad Scorpion Chilli Jam2022-02-23T15:48:18+00:00

The male of the minotaur beetle has three characteristic horns arising from its thorax. This is one of the UK’s dung beetles, which drag balls of dung into their burrows for the beetle larvae to feed on. It is one of nature’s wonderful nutrient recyclers. Further information can be found on the Wildlife Trusts website.

Monarch Butterfly – on Tayberry Jam2022-02-21T16:10:40+00:00

The Monarch is a rare find in the UK, much like the tayberry. It is a migrant visitor to our shores, most commonly in the South West, and is the largest butterfly to be seen in the UK. Further information can be found on the Butterfly Conservation website.

Pied Hoverfly – on Grapefruit Marmalade2022-02-23T18:25:48+00:00

This pretty little hoverfly is found throughout the UK. It is recognised by three cream coloured bands on either side of the abdomen. The larvae feed on aphids, helping with pest control, while the adults are proficient pollinators.

Pine Hoverfly – on Seville Marmalade (coarse cut)2022-02-23T16:31:35+00:00

The pine hoverfly is thought to be the most endangered hoverfly in the UK. It is normally found in Scotland, but the numbers have been declining since the 1990s. The main reason for this decline is the loss of habitat for the larvae to develop in – they like wet holes in tree stumps. Further information can be found on the RSPB and Forestry and Land Scotland websites.

Pollen Beetle – on Real Ale Chutney2022-02-23T17:47:32+00:00

Pollen beetles are commonly found throughout the UK feeding on pollen and pollinating as they move from one plant to the next. They seem to particularly like yellow flowers. Further information can be found on the Royal Horticultural Society website.

Purple Emperor Butterfly – on Victoria Plum Jam2022-02-21T16:03:17+00:00

The purple emperor butterfly can mainly be found in woodland throughout the South of England. The adults may occasionally be seen extracting salts from animal dung on the ground. Further information can be found on the Wildlife Trusts website.

Red Mason Bee – on Damson Jam2022-02-21T14:14:58+00:00

The Red Mason Bee is one of the most common solitary bees in the UK and gets its name from the habit of nesting in small holes in brickwork. They are a prolific pollinator, often found pollinating apple and pear trees and hanging around in an orchard. Further information can be found on the Bumblebee Conservation Trust website.

Red Soldier Beetle – on caramelised onion chutney2022-02-23T17:36:59+00:00

This bright red coloured beetle is also known as the bloodsucker because of its colour, although it is harmless. The larvae eat slugs and snails, while the adults eat aphids. The adults also eat pollen, but can often be found covered in pollen, so pollinate as they move from one flower to another. Further information can be found on the Wildlife Trusts website.

Red-Tailed Bumblebee – on Rhubarb and Ginger Jam2022-02-21T14:58:56+00:00

The red-tailed bumblebee is widespread across the UK and is easily identified by its red-coloured hairy tail. It is an important pollinator and can be found in a wide range of habitats from urban gardens to open countryside. Further information can be found on the Bees, Wasps and Ants Recording Society website.

Rhinoceros Beetle – on Carolina Reaper Chilli Jam2022-02-23T15:50:50+00:00

The rhinoceros beetle is one of the UK’s group of stag beetles. It commonly inhabits woodland, feeding and breeding in dead wood, helping to break down the fallen trees and return nutrients to the soil. Further information can be found on the Woodland Trust website.

Rose Chafer Beetle – on Boxing Day chutney2022-02-23T17:52:19+00:00

This beautiful iridescent green coloured beetle looks like a little Christmas bauble, so this is why we chose this pretty insect for our Boxing Day chutney. The larvae feed on rotting vegetation and the adults feed on nectar and pollen. This means that this beetle acts both as a pollinator and adds nutrients back into the soil by breaking up rotting material throughout the two stages of its life cycle. Further information may be found on the Woodland Trusts website.

Scarlett Tiger Moth – on chilli Jelly2022-02-23T15:26:53+00:00

The Scarlet Tiger moth is mainly found in the south and west of England and Wales, preferring wetland and coastal habitats. Further information can be found on the Butterfly Conservation website.

Sexton Beetle – on cranberry sauce2022-02-23T18:00:59+00:00

The sexton beetle is often referred to as the undertaker of the animal world. It is a burying beetle that will bury the remains of dead animals underground. They are named after the sexton, who was the person in charge of looking after a church graveyard. They perform a wonderful role in improving the soil and adding nutrients back into the ground from the small animals and birds that they bury. Further information can be found on the Wildlife Trusts website.

Shrill Carder Bee – on Chuckleberry Jam2022-02-21T14:47:13+00:00

The shrill carder bee, named for its high-pitched buzz, is one of the UK’s rarest bumblebees and is a high priority for conservation. It has a long tongue so likes to feed on more tubular-shaped flowers. It emerges from hibernation later than other bees so needs to forage right into September and red clover is a particular favourite. Further information can be found on the Bumblebee Conservation Trust website.

Silver Y Moth – on Sage Jelly2022-02-23T15:25:10+00:00

This moth flies by both day and night and is found throughout the UK. It is a key pollinator and the adults can often be seen feeding at dusk. Further information can be found on the Butterfly Conservation website.

Six-spot Burnet Moth – on Redcurrant Jelly2022-02-21T16:20:38+00:00

I have fond memories of childhood walks around local parkland and seeing these beautiful vibrant moths foraging from and pollinating wild flowers such as knapweed and thistles. Now they are a rare sight in the same locations, although they are the most widespread Burnet Moth throughout the UK. Further information can be found on the Butterfly Conservation website.

Small Scissor Bee – on Blackcurrant Jam2022-02-21T14:26:58+00:00

The small scissor bee is England’s smallest pollinator. It grows to around 1cm long and is most commonly seen in gardens, heathland and downland in early summer. They particularly like wildflowers and Campanula (Harebells) so if you have these in a garden look out for these tiny bees. The females nest in old woodworm holes in dead wood and the males sleep inside the flowers – how cute!

Stag Beetle – on Moruga Brainstrain chilli jam2022-02-23T16:17:40+00:00

The stag beetle is instantly recognisable and found across the South East of England. These beetles lay their eggs in dead and rotting wood for their larvae to feed on. The larvae spend up to six years feeding on old trees and dead wood, helping to return nutrients to the soil. Further information can be found on the Wildlife Trusts website.

Swallow-tailed moth – on Mint Jelly2022-02-23T15:21:02+00:00

This nocturnal pollinator is widespread throughout the UK and particularly haunts woodland, hedgerows and gardens. Further information can be found on the Butterfly Conservation website.

Swallowtail Butterfly – on Boysenberry Jam2022-02-21T16:12:49+00:00

This is one of the rarest butterflies in the UK, much like the boysenberry. They are normally only found in Norfolk in fenland around the Norfolk Broads. Further information can be found on the Butterfly Conservation website.

Tapered-drone Hoverfly – on Tipsy Seville Marmalade (coarse cut)2022-02-23T16:36:37+00:00

The tapered-drone hoverfly mimics the male honeybee (the drone), with large eyes and a hairy body. It is widespread and pollinates in gardens and other urban areas. Further information can be found on the Wildlife Trusts website.

Tawny Mining Bee – on Plum Jam2022-02-21T15:01:53+00:00

The tawny mining bee has dense ginger hair and can commonly be seen flying in spring. These solitary bees may nest in large groups in lawns and other urban environments. They feed on a variety of spring flowers, such as hawthorn, blackthorn and dandelions and will be found pollinating spring flowering fruit trees. Further information can be found on the Bumblebee Conservation Trust website.

Tree Bumblebee – on Blackberry Jam2022-02-21T14:45:02+00:00

The Tree Bumblebee is a relative newcomer and only arrived in the UK from Europe this century, but it has been able to thrive and is now widespread across the UK. It prefers urban and woodland environments and can often nest in garden bird boxes as well as holes in trees. They will feed on and pollinate fruits such as raspberries, apples, gooseberries and currants, as well as blackberries later in the year. More information can be found on the Bumblebee Conservation Trust website.

Violet Ground Beetle – on Beetroot and Horseradish Chutney2022-02-23T17:34:45+00:00

The violet ground beetle is a beautiful metallic purple colour and, as the name suggests, can be found on the ground. They are nocturnal predators and regularly feed on slugs, providing an important pest-control service. Further information can be found on the Wildlife Trusts website.

Wasp Beetle – on Chilli Jam2022-02-23T15:29:28+00:00

The wasp beetle mimics the yellow and black stripes of the wasp to trick predators. The larvae of this pollinator live in dead wood, helping to break this down. Further information can be found on the Wildlife Trusts website.

White-faced Mason Bee – on Blackberry and Apple Jam2022-02-23T18:23:06+00:00

This solitary bee is rarely seen in the UK, with only three sightings in the South East. It is also known as Europe’s Orchard bee, so guess where this little insect likes to spend its time pollinating? The Bees, Wasps and Ants Recording Society are keen to receive reports of this little bee, so if you have a bee hotel, especially if you live in or around London, watch out for early activity in March to see if you can spot one.

White-tailed bumblebee – on Strawberry Jam2022-02-21T14:57:18+00:00

The white-tailed bumblebee is another of the most common species found throughout the UK, making this an important pollinator. It emerges in spring and can be found feeding on a variety of flowers through to the autumn. They are seen in a variety of habitats and can be found nesting in gardens, woodland, farmland and heathland. Further information can be found on the Wildlife Trusts website.

Wool Carder Bee – on Gooseberry Jam2022-02-21T14:25:52+00:00

The wool carder bee has unique and distinctive yellow spots down either side of the abdomen. They pollinate a variety of flowers and particularly like hairy plants. The females collect fibres from these plants to line their nests. Further information can be found on the Bumblebee Conservation Trust website.

Yellow-Barred Longhorn Moth – on Rosemary Jelly2022-02-23T15:23:00+00:00

This day flying pollinator is widespread throughout the UK and can be identified by its distinctive long antennae. It is found in woodland, leafy lanes and hedgerows as the larvae need to feed on leaf litter, helping to break this down.

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